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By Smokey - / Monday 31 July 2017 00:30 /
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By  stephh_1  |  11

Too many negative votes, comment buried. Show the comment

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  khaleesi_reyna  |  13

Honestly I doubt that. Most millennials I know might say something once about it but it would probably be like "that's bad for you" and thatd be the end of it. They wouldn't get pissy about seeing someone smoking (esp if they can't smell it). Baby boomers on the other hand are some of the most entitled, thin-skinned whiners I've ever seen. The neighbors are probably Boomers

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  Demon_of_Light  |  26

It's not really the smell that people generally take issue with, it's the increased risk of the toxic side effects of second hand smoke, like asthma, heart disease, and cancer. That being said, if you're out of smelling range, you're probably out of range of second hand smoke, so I'm not sure why a visual would be such a problem.

By  K3719er  |  8

Too many negative votes, comment buried. Show the comment

By  Lobby_Bee  |  14

Similar situation happened to me. I just kept doing what I was doing and they went to complain to management. Management told them I have every right to smoke and because I was smoking far away from the walkways and front lobby doors, they can't do anything to me. There will always be people that think the world revolves around them.

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  Briarpatch  |  16

I would not be surprised to find out that they're ex-smokers themselves -- ex-smokers are more likely to be uber-offended by smoke than anyone else. I've not smoked in about ten years now, and I try to be extra-understanding around smokers in open places precisely because of how rude and unreasonable people could be to me when I was a smoker. I had a neighbor who once complained to me when I smoked outside. He claimed that there must be "some freak thing with the wind" (his words exactly) that carried the smoke down the building, around the corner, past his bedroom window, and into his living room window. Even though I had no legal obligation to do so, I started smoking farther away from the building, where I noticed that the people who lived in the building next door would lean out their window to smoke, right next to his living room window. I pointed this out to him. He lied and said that he never said he could smell the smoke in his living room, and that it was the kitchen he had mentioned. He also let it slip that he was an ex-smoker, and couldn't stand the smell of smoke because it made him want a cigarette. I wanted to say, "The difference between you and me is that I can quit smoking and take away what it is that you don't like about me. But I'm pretty sure I'll always not like you, because you'll always be an asshole."

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