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that's just stupid, if you are born here, YOU are not "African-American", you're american. you'd be considered american with african ancestry. people these days want to label everything.

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10- people are so afraid of being called racist/sexist/homophobic or being known as prejudiced in any manner that they go out of their way to kiss the asses of anyone different. It's pathetic but that's the American society for you.

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There are some black people who aren't African-American, such as Afro-Caribbean people for example. Toward the FML: "black" isn't really a degrading or racist term I don't see how anyone can see it's inappropriate to say "black."

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It is but so many people just use racial things one way. How many of those same people would call you racist for saying that a white person from algeria(a former french territory in africa) was african american? Too many despite the fact that that white person was litterally from africa and op most likely has never even been there.

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#69, you do realize that more and more black people prefer to be called black over African American, right? Personally, I identify as Nigerian-American because I'm nigerian. I always used to refer to my black friends as African American until a couple of them sat me down and explained to me that they'd rather be called black, and not African American since their families have no real ties to African culture anymore. They said they don't *feel* like Africans. They don't know the languages, or

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#105 I never understood that whole 'let's not see skin color and identify people by it' bullshit. It's completely acceptable for me to identify a redhead by their red hair and CALL them a redhead, so why can't I look at something as obvious as skin color the same way?

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For instance, I was born in Saint Lucia to Dominican parents. I have no ties to Africa and the only family members who are American born would be my nieces/nephews. I prefer black and get irritated by African American, because it's not true of me and I'm wary of those trying to "prove" they are not racist by being overly PC.

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I hate it when people say "African-American" because most of them are just american so calling them "African American" is basically calling them unamerican

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Or if op is from Jamaica, or is black and his family has been in America for generations... its stupid to try and enforce certain ideas of a minority ONTO said minority. If OP is good being considered black instead of African American, calm your shit and respect it.

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I can't think of anything more racist than telling someone how they should be "allowed" to define themselves.

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True, because it's only America that has this problem. You don't hear labels such as African-British, African-Australian, etc...

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I wish it didn't happen here. I think it pushes people apart. When someone moves here (legally...) why aren't they just considered an American? Instead, they're called African-American, Mexican-American, Italian-American, etc. It's perfectly fine to have your own traditions/culture while living in America, because everyone's different, but the labels and need to be politically correct really, really bother me.

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I am a white person living in Africa, and we are often referred to as 'European' - so no, it is not just an American thing. It is a 'us and them' thing and people need to get the f over it!

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The labels are a way for people to remain connected to their culture as much as keeping up with their cultural traditions are. I'm Nigerian-American. That's where my family is from, that's where we're culturally connected, and that's where we draw the traditions we follow from. For me, identifying as Nigerian-American is a point of pride. It's a way for me to say that I'm proud of where I came from. My group of best friends consists of an Indian-American (Asian indian. Not Native American Indi

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#21, you should see Jeff Dunhams latest comedy movie. "Walter" actually says something about this. He gets all confused about a black guy living in Britain and decided to call him "African-British". It's pretty funny.

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that's just stupid, if you are born here, YOU are not "African-American", you're american. you'd be considered american with african ancestry. people these days want to label everything.

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Actually #11, you are classed as the nationality of whoever owns the bit of land you were born in. My aunty is British, because she was born in a British army base in West Germany. Similarly, if you were born in International waters you would have no nationality, until the ship came into port. In which case, you take the nationality of whoever owns the port.

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Sylvester Stallone was actually born in a stable in Italy. That's why he is the Italian-Stallion.

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#18. My sister was born in Germany in a German Hospital but she Isn't German...My parents were able to get her classed as a British Citizen, I don't know what they did or how how but they said they had to sign something and it was Done and Dusted

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#11 No need to be that aggressive. Take a deep breath. You seem to be mixing nationality and ethnicity. I think it's weird to say African-American to be honest. I don't get all the fuss about saying the word "black". It's not offensive. There is nothing wrong with being black, so why tiptoe around it? Nobody says "European American". #35 A friend of mine was born in Germany to British parents, and lived in France her whole life. She is British because she took the nationalit

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52, The main source of White South Africans comes from Dutch Ancestory, that's why they have surnames like Bosshoff, Dumas, Du Plessis and Pistorius

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Oops, looks like I made a mistake. I just checked Wikipedia, and Germany actually allows dual citizenship under some circumstances. My bad.

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54: Good point, bad examples. Two of those names are French and one is Latin. Before the 20th century, the Dutch didn't have the numbers to populate their colonies, so many Afrikaners were originally from France or Germany.

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What if the OP was not born here, what if he's not American? What if the OP is not from Africa? He's not African then. My grandparents are Polish and German, I'm American.

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Most of the black people I know actually hate being called African American because most of them are being labeled as something they're not.

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So am I German-Scottish-American? I have German and scot in my blood, but have never been to either country. Actually it's so far back in my bloodlines. Now, I am thoroughly intrigued by both cultures, and have learned some German, but I am American. I'm white. I actually tend to refer to myself as a Mutt when it comes to heritage and ancestry. Same can go for black people. And frankly, I couldn't care less if someone calls me white, I don't see a problem with calling someone else black. Though

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To clarify for everyone-- the term 'African-American' was started in the 1970's by the Black Power movement. The idea behind the term was to bridge a gap between African ancestry and being in America. You do have to keep in mind, for America at least, there is a huge difference between having ancestors who willingly immigrated here and ancestors who were kidnapped and brought here to be kept as slaves. The term was initially meant to take ownership of that difference. As the American population

That is funny. So if to a black person you say African-American to a white person you have to say caucasian.

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I think it's deemed as racist when you use it as an 'insult' along with many other, shall we say, colorful words. Black friends of mine never mind it, and prefer it over African-American. But that's only them, so some others might view it differently.

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I agree, history and ignorance has proven there are a lot worse names to throw at other races... having gone from extreme racism in this country (SA), 'black' is deemed perfectly acceptable and even official.

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